B/ES/05/14: Environmental impact assessment of transgenic grapevines and plums on virus populations

GMTW-127 , updated 8 Sep 2010
B/ES/05/14
not known whether content was given by the Spanish Competent Authority
2005 - 2010
1200 m2
e.r.a.
impact on virus populations

Tree species

Prunus domestica
plum
European plum
hybrid Stanley C5 (Honey Sweet), also described as cultivar Bluebyrd
Stone fruit species that includes several varieties (e.g. Common plums, damsons, mirabelle); cultivated in Europe, Asia (China) and parts of the Americas; pollinated by bees.

Notifier & developers

Locations of this trial

All trial locations with the same GM trees

Locationsort icon Country
Bistrita Romania
Llíria Spain
Poland Poland
Praha-Ruzyně Czech Republic
Romania Romania
Spain Spain
West Virginia (WV) USA

Description

"Transgenic plums that will be studied were established in the field in 1996 regarding the project "Field testing of transgenic plums containing Plum pox virus coat protein gene" (notification number B/ES/96/16)." (JRC notification 2005)
"The main objective of the project is to evaluate under field conditions the impact of the PPV-CP transgenic plums on the dynamics and variability of virus populations. Our safety assessment studies will determine the potential of heterologous viruses (Apple chlorotic leafspot virus [ACLSV], Prune dwarf virus [PDV] and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus [PNRSV]) at reverting the engineered protection to PPV in transgenic plums. Mixes of viruses will be inoculated by grafting onto transgenic plums and PPV infection on the grafted transgenic plums and the diversity of virus populations within, will be evaluated in successive Springs. [...] Transgenic plums that will be studied were established in the field in 1996 regarding the project "Field testing of transgenic plums containing Plum pox virus coat protein gene" (notification number B/ES/96/16). Results from these studies demonstrated that the transgenic line C5 is highly resistant to natural infection of PPV. Additionally, the C4 transgenic line showed a remarkable delay in the infection, and the rest of the analysed transgenic (C6, PT-6 and PT-23) and non-transgenic (non-transformed P. domestica and P. salicina) lines were not resistant to PPV. These result will be published by Malinowski et al. (2005) "Field trials of plum clones (Prunus domestica L.) transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein (PPV-CP) gene demonstrate resistance to plum pox disease"." (JRC 2005)